Charger device for Interskol 12v electric screwdriver

Charger for electric screwdriver Interskol 12V

Charger Interskol 2401 001, 10.8V Li-ion

Charger Interskol DA-10 / 14.4ER

Drill-electric screwdriver Interskol DA-10 / 14.4M2, with two batteries.

Battery for Bosch screwdrivers Charge LIB 1430 BM-C

Interskol Universal charger, Ni-Cd 2401.

Battery charging power supply unit for RWS drill DA-14.4

Charger for Interskol DA-12,14.4,18ER unive.

Battery charging base for drills RWS DA-12, DA-14.4.

Rechargeable battery Interskol PA-10 / 14.4ER

Charger Interskol 2401 001, 10.8V Li-ion

Hammer AB142 battery pack 14.4 V 1.2 Ah

Accumulator block Pitatel TSB-168-SKI14B-21M 14.4 V 2.

Battery for Interskol 14.4V, 1.5 Ah, NiCd, box.

Hammer ZU 30M 14.4 V charger

Battery Practice for Interskol 14.4V, 1.5 Ah, NiCd.

Battery for the Interskol electric screwdriver 14.4V, 1.5 Ah, Ni.

Cordless drill-electric screwdriver Interskol DA-14,4 ER

Battery for Makita screwdrivers Charge LIB 1430 MK-S

Battery for Interskol PRACTICE 776-812

Charger for Interskol tool (10.8V Li.

Accumulator block Hammer Akb1420 14.4 V 2 Ah

Battery Practice for Interskol, Ni-Cd, 14.4 V, 1.5.

Interskol universal charger, ni-cd, 159.

Charger Interskol DA-10 / 14.4 ER

Battery Interskol 181.02.03.00. 14.4V 1.3 Ah Li-io.

Charger for DA-18ER Interskol

Interskol Rechargeable battery 18V, 1.5 Ah NiCd DA-1.

Rechargeable battery “Zubr” for screwdriver.

Battery Practice for Interskol 14.4V, 1.5 Ah, NiCd.

Battery Practice for Interskol 14.4V, 1.5 Ah, NiCd.

Charger Interskol 2401 001, 10.8V Li-ion

Charger for DA-14,4ER Interskol

Hammer AKM1420 14.4 V battery pack

Interskol DA-10 / 14.4M3 cordless electric screwdriver 1.3Ah.

The rechargeable battery for the Pitatel tool for Inte.

Interskol accumulator 14 V (for DA-14ER, 1.5 Ah)

Battery for Interskol tool (1.3Ah 14.4V) (18.

Accumulator Hammer Ab144 14.4 V 2 Ah

Drill-electric screwdriver Interskol DA-14.4ER DM, with two batteries.

Charger DA-14.4ER, 1.5A, 18V, Li-ion Intersko.

Universal charger Interskol Ni-Cd 2401.

Interskol 18.0V 1.5Ah nicd accumulator, for DA-18 ER

Battery Practice for Interskol 14.4V, 1.5 Ah, NiCd.

Accumulator battery Pitatel “181.02.03.00.00qu.

Without hesitation, the power tool greatly simplifies our work, and also reduces the time of routine operations. Various self-powered screwdrivers are currently in use.

Let’s see the device, the schematic diagram and the repair of the battery charger from the “Interskol” screwdriver.

First of all, let’s take a look at the schematic diagram. It is copied from a real PCB of the charger.

Charger IC (CDQ-F06K1).

The power section of the charger consists of a GS-1415 power transformer. Its power is about 25-26 watts. I counted according to a simplified formula, which I already mentioned here.

The reduced alternating voltage 18V from the secondary winding of the transformer is fed to the diode bridge through the fuse FU1. The diode bridge consists of 4 diodes VD1-VD4 type 1N5408. Any of the 1N5408 diodes can withstand a forward current of 3 amperes. Electrolytic capacitor C1 smooths the voltage ripple downstream of the diode bridge.

The base of the control circuit is the HCF4060BE microcircuit, which is a 14-bit counter with elements for the master oscillator. It drives the S9012 pnp bipolar transistor. The transistor is loaded on the S3-12A electrical relay. The U1 microcircuit implements a typical timer that turns on the relay for a given charge time. about 60 minutes.

When the charger is connected to the network and the battery is connected, the contacts of the JDQK1 relay are open.

The HCF4060BE microcircuit is powered by a VD6 Zener diode. 1N4742A (12V). The zener diode limits the voltage from the mains rectifier to 12 volts, because its output is about 24 volts.

If you look at the diagram, you can easily see that before pressing the “Start” button, the U1 HCF4060BE microcircuit is de-energized. disconnected from the power source. When the “Start” button is pressed, the supply voltage from the rectifier goes to the 1N4742A zener diode through the resistor R6.

Charger for electric screwdriver “Interskol

The power section of the screwdriver charger is a power transformer type GS-1415 designed for a power of 25 watts.

A reduced alternating voltage of 18V is removed from the secondary winding of the transformer, it follows on diode bridge of 4 diodes VD1-VD4 type 1N5408, through a fuse. Diode bridge. Each 1N5408 semiconductor element is rated for forward currents up to three amperes. The electrolytic capacitance C1 smooths out the ripple appearing in the circuit after the diode bridge.

Management is implemented on a microassembly HCF4060BE, which combines a 14-bit counter with oscillator components. It drives a bipolar transistor type S9012. It is loaded on a relay of type S3-12A. Thus, a timer is schematically implemented, which turns on the relay for a time of charging the battery for about an hour. When the charger is turned on and the battery is connected, the relay contacts are in the normally open position. HCF4060BE receives power through a 12 volt zener diode 1N4742A, because about 24 volts goes from the rectifier output.

When the “Start” button is closed, the voltage from the rectifier begins to follow to the zener diode through the resistance R6, then the stabilized voltage goes to the 16th pin of U1. The S9012 transistor, which is controlled by the HCF4060BE, turns on. The voltage across the open junctions of the S9012 transistor follows the relay coil. The contacts of the latter are closed, and the battery begins to charge. The protective diode VD8 (1N4007) bypasses the relay and protects VT from a reverse voltage surge that occurs when the relay winding is de-energized. VD5 prevents the battery from discharging when the mains voltage is disconnected. With the opening of the contacts of the “Start” button, nothing will happen because the power goes through the diode VD7 (1N4007), the Zener diode VD6 and the quenching resistor R6. Therefore, the microcircuit will receive power even after the button is released.

Replaceable typical battery from the power tool is assembled from separate series-connected nickel-cadmium Ni-Cd batteries, each of 1.2 volts, so there are 12 of them. The total voltage of such a battery will be about 14.4 volts. In addition, a temperature sensor has been added to the battery pack. SA1 it is glued to one of the Ni-Cd batteries and fits snugly to it. One of the terminals of the thermostat is connected to the minus of the storage battery. The second pin is connected to a separate, third connector.

When the “Start” button is pressed, the relay closes its contacts, and the battery charging process begins. The red LED lights up. An hour later, the relay with its contacts breaks the battery charge circuit of the screwdriver. The green LED lights up and the red one goes out.

A thermal contact monitors the temperature of the battery and breaks the charging circuit if the temperature is above 45 °. If this happens before the timer circuit runs out, this indicates the presence of a “memory effect”.

Typical malfunctions of an electric screwdriver charger

Over time, due to wear and tear, the “Start” button works buggy, and sometimes does not work at all. Also, in my practice, the 1N4742A zener diode and HCF4060BE microcircuits took off. If the charger circuit is working properly and does not cause suspicion, and the charge does not start, then it is necessary to check the thermal switch in the battery pack, carefully disassembling it.

The design is based on an adjustable positive voltage regulator. It allows operation with a load current of up to 1.5A, which is quite enough to charge the batteries.

Alternating voltage of 13V, is removed from the secondary winding of the transformer, rectified by a diode bridge D3SBA40. At its output there is a filter capacitor C1, which reduces the ripple of the rectified voltage. From the rectifier, a constant voltage is supplied to an integral stabilizer, the output voltage of which is set by the resistance of the resistor R4 at 14.1V (Depends on the type of battery of the electric screwdriver). The charging current sensor is the resistance R3, in parallel to which the trimmer R2 is connected, with the help of this resistance the level of the charging current is set, which corresponds to 0.1 of the battery capacity. At the first stage, the battery is charged with a stable current, then when the charging current becomes less than the limiting current value, the battery will be charged with a lower current to the stabilization voltage DA1.

The charging current sensor for the HL1 LED is VD2. In this case, HL1 will indicate a current of up to 50 milliamperes. If R3 is used as a current sensor, then the LED will go out at a current of 0.6A, which would be too early. The battery would not have had time to charge. This device can also be used with 6-volt batteries.

The amateur radio design is used to discharge and charge 1.2 Ah NiCd batteries. At its core, this is an improved standard charger for an electric screwdriver, in which a circuit is introduced that controls the additional discharge and subsequent charge of the battery. After connecting the battery to the charger, the process of discharging the battery with a current of 120 mA to a voltage of 10 V starts, then the battery starts charging with a current of 400 mA. The charge stops when the voltage on the screwdriver battery reaches 15.2 V or by timer after 3.5 hours (programmed in the MK firmware).

When discharged, HL1 is constantly on. During the charging process, the HL2 LED is on and the HL1 blinks at intervals of once every 5 seconds. After the end of the battery charge, upon reaching the upper voltage level, HL1 starts blinking rapidly (2 blinks with a pause of 600 ms). If the charge is terminated by the timer, then HL1 blinks once every 600 ms. If the supply voltage has disappeared during the charging process, the timer is stopped. And the PIC12F675 microcontroller receives power from the battery, through a diode, inside the transistor VT2. Firmware for MK on the link above.

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When connected to a 220V network, the charger does not show its work in any way. Indicators (green and red LEDs) are off. When a removable battery is connected, a green LED lights up, which indicates that the charger is ready for use.

When the “Start” button is pressed, the electromagnetic relay closes its contacts, and the battery is connected to the output of the mains rectifier, and the battery charging process begins. The red LED lights up and the green one goes out. After 50-60 minutes, the relay opens the battery charging circuit. The green LED lights up and the red one goes out. Charging complete.

After charging, the voltage at the battery terminals can reach 16.8 volts.

This operation algorithm is primitive and eventually leads to the so-called “memory effect” of the battery. That is, the capacity of the battery decreases.

If you follow the correct algorithm for charging the battery, first, each of its elements must be discharged to 1 volt. Those. a block of 12 batteries must be discharged to 12 volts. In the charger for the screwdriver, this mode not implemented.

Here is the charging characteristic of one 1.2V Ni-Cd battery cell.

The graph shows how the temperature of the element (temperature), the voltage at its terminals (voltage) and the relative pressure (relative pressure) change during charging.

Specialized charge controllers for Ni-Cd and Ni-MH batteries, as a rule, work according to the so-called delta method.. The figure shows that at the end of the cell charging, the voltage decreases by a small amount. about 10mV (for Ni-Cd) and 4mV (for Ni-MH). Based on this voltage change, the controller determines whether the element is charged.

Also, during charging, the temperature of the element is monitored using a temperature sensor. Immediately on the graph you can see that the temperature of the charged cell is about 45 0 С.

Let’s go back to the charger circuit from the screwdriver. Now it is clear that the JDD-45 thermal switch monitors the temperature of the battery pack and breaks the charge circuit when the temperature reaches somewhere around 45 ° C. Sometimes this happens before the timer on the HCF4060BE microcircuit is triggered. This happens when the capacity of the battery has decreased due to the “memory effect”. At the same time, a full charge of such a battery occurs a little faster than in 60 minutes.

As you can see from the circuitry, the charging algorithm is not the most optimal and eventually leads to a loss of the battery’s electrical capacity. Therefore, you can use a universal charger to charge the battery, such as the Turnigy Accucell 6.

Scheme, device, repair

Without a doubt, the power tool greatly facilitates our work, and also reduces the time of routine operations. All kinds of self-powered screwdrivers are now in use.

Consider the device, the schematic diagram and the repair of the battery charger from the Interskol screwdriver.

First, let’s take a look at the schematic diagram. It is copied from a real PCB of the charger.

Charger PCB (CDQ-F06K1).

The power section of the charger consists of a GS-1415 power transformer. Its power is about 25-26 watts. I counted according to the simplified formula, which I have already spoken about here.

The reduced alternating voltage 18V from the secondary winding of the transformer is fed to the diode bridge through the fuse FU1. The diode bridge consists of 4 diodes VD1-VD4 type 1N5408. Each of the 1N5408 diodes withstands a forward current of 3 amperes. Electrolytic capacitor C1 smooths the voltage ripple downstream of the diode bridge.

The basis of the control circuit is the HCF4060BE microcircuit, which is a 14-bit counter with elements for the master oscillator. It drives the S9012 pnp bipolar transistor. The transistor is loaded on the S3-12A electromagnetic relay. A kind of timer is implemented on the U1 microcircuit, which turns on the relay for a given charge time. about 60 minutes.

When the charger is connected to the network and the battery is connected, the contacts of the JDQK1 relay are open.

The HCF4060BE microcircuit is powered by a VD6 Zener diode. 1N4742A (12V). The zener diode limits the voltage from the mains rectifier to 12 volts, since its output is about 24 volts.

If you look at the diagram, it is not difficult to notice that before pressing the “Start” button, the U1 HCF4060BE microcircuit is de-energized. disconnected from the power source. When the “Start” button is pressed, the supply voltage from the rectifier goes to the 1N4742A zener diode through the resistor R6.

Further, the reduced and stabilized voltage is supplied to the 16th pin of the U1 microcircuit. The microcircuit starts to work, and also the S9012 transistor, which it controls, opens.

The supply voltage through the open transistor S9012 is supplied to the winding of the JDQK1 electromagnetic relay. The relay contacts close and supply voltage to the battery. The battery starts charging. The VD8 diode (1N4007) shunts the relay and protects the S9012 transistor from a reverse voltage surge that occurs when the relay winding is de-energized.

Diode VD5 (1N5408) protects the battery from discharge if the mains supply is suddenly cut off.

DIY: Battery Drill to Mains

What will happen after the contacts of the “Start” button open? The diagram shows that when the contacts of the electromagnetic relay are closed, the positive voltage through the diode VD7 (1N4007) goes to the Zener diode VD6 through the quenching resistor R6. As a result, the U1 microcircuit remains connected to the power source even after the button contacts are open.

Possible charger malfunctions.

Over time, due to wear and tear and moisture, the SK1 “Start” button begins to work poorly, and sometimes even fails. It is clear that if the SK1 button fails, we will not be able to supply power to the U1 microcircuit and start the timer.

There may also be a failure of the VD6 Zener diode (1N4742A) and the U1 microcircuit (HCF4060BE). In this case, when the button is pressed, charging does not turn on, there is no indication.

In my practice, there was a case when the zener diode struck, with a multimeter it “rang” like a piece of wire. After replacing it, the charging began to work properly. Any zener diode for a stabilization voltage of 12V and a power of 1 W is suitable for replacement. You can check the Zener diode for “breakdown” in the same way as a conventional diode. I already talked about checking diodes.

After repair, you need to check the operation of the device. Press the button to start charging the battery. After about an hour, the charger should turn off (the “Network” indicator (green) will light up. Take out the battery and make a “control” measurement of the voltage at its terminals. The battery must be charged.

If the elements of the printed circuit board are in good working order and do not cause suspicion, and the charging mode does not turn on, then the thermal switch SA1 (JDD-45 2A) in the battery pack should be checked.

The scheme is quite primitive and does not cause problems when diagnosing a malfunction and repairing, even for novice radio amateurs.

Suddenly, Shurik’s charger stopped turning on, using the “scientific poke” method, he determined that the problem was in the button, found similar buttons in his stocks. I re-soldered the buttons, although it was also not without modifications, the old button was much longer, a screw that was suitable for the size helped. earned))

How to repair a charger for an Interskol electric screwdriver

The algorithm of the circuit is quite simple.

When connected to a 220V network, the charger does not show its work in any way. Indicators (green and red LEDs) are off. When a removable battery is connected, a green LED lights up, which indicates that the charger is ready for use.

When the “Start” button is pressed, the electromagnetic relay closes its contacts, and the battery is connected to the output of the mains rectifier, and the battery charging process begins. The red LED lights up and the green one goes out. After 50-60 minutes, the relay opens the battery charging circuit. The green LED lights up and the red one goes out. Charging complete.

After charging, the voltage at the battery terminals can reach 16.8 volts.

This operation algorithm is primitive and eventually leads to the so-called “memory effect” of the battery. That is, the capacity of the battery decreases.

If you follow the correct algorithm for charging the battery, first, each of its elements must be discharged to 1 volt. Those. a block of 12 batteries must be discharged to 12 volts. In the charger for the screwdriver, this mode not implemented.

Here is the charging characteristic of one 1.2V Ni-Cd battery cell.

The graph shows how the temperature of the element (temperature), the voltage at its terminals (voltage) and the relative pressure (relative pressure) change during charging.

Specialized charge controllers for Ni-Cd and Ni-MH batteries, as a rule, work according to the so-called delta method.. The figure shows that at the end of the cell charging, the voltage decreases by a small amount. about 10mV (for Ni-Cd) and 4mV (for Ni-MH). Based on this voltage change, the controller determines whether the element is charged.

Also, during charging, the temperature of the element is monitored using a temperature sensor. Immediately on the graph you can see that the temperature of the charged cell is about 45 0 С.

Let’s go back to the charger circuit from the screwdriver. Now it is clear that the JDD-45 thermal switch monitors the temperature of the battery pack and breaks the charge circuit when the temperature reaches somewhere around 45 ° C. Sometimes this happens before the timer on the HCF4060BE microcircuit is triggered. This happens when the capacity of the battery has decreased due to the “memory effect”. At the same time, a full charge of such a battery occurs a little faster than in 60 minutes.

As you can see from the circuitry, the charging algorithm is not the most optimal and, over time, leads to a loss of the battery’s electrical capacity. Therefore, you can use a universal charger to charge the battery, such as the Turnigy Accucell 6.

Scheme, device, repair

Without a doubt, the power tool greatly facilitates our work, and also reduces the time of routine operations. All kinds of self-powered screwdrivers are now in use.

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Consider the device, the schematic diagram and the repair of the battery charger from the Interskol screwdriver.

First, let’s take a look at the schematic diagram. It is copied from a real PCB of the charger.

Charger PCB (CDQ-F06K1).

29 for Xiaomi Mijia Electric Screwdriver UNISEX Tool

The power section of the charger consists of a GS-1415 power transformer. Its power is about 25-26 watts. I counted according to the simplified formula, which I have already spoken about here.

The reduced alternating voltage 18V from the secondary winding of the transformer is fed to the diode bridge through the fuse FU1. The diode bridge consists of 4 diodes VD1-VD4 type 1N5408. Each of the 1N5408 diodes withstands a forward current of 3 amperes. Electrolytic capacitor C1 smooths the voltage ripple downstream of the diode bridge.

The basis of the control circuit is the HCF4060BE microcircuit, which is a 14-bit counter with elements for the master oscillator. It drives the S9012 pnp bipolar transistor. The transistor is loaded on the S3-12A electromagnetic relay. A kind of timer is implemented on the U1 microcircuit, which turns on the relay for a given charge time. about 60 minutes.

When the charger is connected to the network and the battery is connected, the contacts of the JDQK1 relay are open.

The HCF4060BE microcircuit is powered by a VD6 Zener diode. 1N4742A (12V). The zener diode limits the voltage from the mains rectifier to 12 volts, since its output is about 24 volts.

If you look at the diagram, it is not difficult to notice that before pressing the “Start” button, the U1 HCF4060BE microcircuit is de-energized. disconnected from the power source. When the “Start” button is pressed, the supply voltage from the rectifier goes to the 1N4742A zener diode through the resistor R6.

Further, the reduced and stabilized voltage is supplied to the 16th pin of the U1 microcircuit. The microcircuit starts to work, and also the S9012 transistor, which it controls, opens.

The supply voltage through the open transistor S9012 is supplied to the winding of the JDQK1 electromagnetic relay. The relay contacts close and supply voltage to the battery. The battery starts charging. The VD8 diode (1N4007) shunts the relay and protects the S9012 transistor from a reverse voltage surge that occurs when the relay winding is de-energized.

Diode VD5 (1N5408) protects the battery from discharge if the mains supply is suddenly cut off.

What will happen after the contacts of the “Start” button open? The diagram shows that when the contacts of the electromagnetic relay are closed, the positive voltage through the diode VD7 (1N4007) goes to the Zener diode VD6 through the quenching resistor R6. As a result, the U1 microcircuit remains connected to the power source even after the button contacts are open.

Typical malfunctions of an electric screwdriver charger

Over time, due to wear and tear, the “Start” button works buggy, and sometimes does not work at all. Also, in my practice, the 1N4742A zener diode and HCF4060BE microcircuits took off. If the charger circuit is working properly and does not cause suspicion, and the charge does not start, then it is necessary to check the thermal switch in the battery pack, carefully disassembling it.

The design is based on an adjustable positive voltage regulator. It allows operation with a load current of up to 1.5A, which is quite enough to charge the batteries.

Alternating voltage of 13V, is removed from the secondary winding of the transformer, rectified by a diode bridge D3SBA40. At its output there is a filter capacitor C1, which reduces the ripple of the rectified voltage. From the rectifier, a constant voltage is supplied to an integral stabilizer, the output voltage of which is set by the resistance of the resistor R4 at 14.1V (Depends on the type of battery of the electric screwdriver). The charging current sensor is the resistance R3, in parallel to which the trimmer R2 is connected, with the help of this resistance the level of the charging current is set, which corresponds to 0.1 of the battery capacity. At the first stage, the battery is charged with a stable current, then when the charging current becomes less than the limiting current value, the battery will be charged with a lower current to the stabilization voltage DA1.

The charging current sensor for the HL1 LED is VD2. In this case, HL1 will indicate a current of up to 50 milliamperes. If R3 is used as a current sensor, then the LED will go out at a current of 0.6A, which would be too early. The battery would not have had time to charge. This device can also be used with 6-volt batteries.

The amateur radio design is used to discharge and charge 1.2 Ah NiCd batteries. At its core, this is an improved standard charger for an electric screwdriver, in which a circuit is introduced that controls the additional discharge and subsequent charge of the battery. After connecting the battery to the charger, the process of discharging the battery with a current of 120 mA to a voltage of 10 V starts, then the battery starts charging with a current of 400 mA. The charge stops when the voltage on the screwdriver battery reaches 15.2 V or by timer after 3.5 hours (programmed in the MK firmware).

When discharged, HL1 is constantly on. During the charging process, the HL2 LED is on and the HL1 blinks at intervals of once every 5 seconds. After the end of the battery charge, upon reaching the upper voltage level, HL1 starts blinking rapidly (2 blinks with a pause of 600 ms). If the charge is terminated by the timer, then HL1 blinks once every 600 ms. If the supply voltage has disappeared during the charging process, the timer is stopped. And the PIC12F675 microcontroller receives power from the battery, through a diode, inside the transistor VT2. Firmware for MK on the link above.

The algorithm of the circuit is quite simple.

When connected to a 220V network, the charger does not show its work in any way. Indicators (green and red LEDs) are off. When a removable battery is connected, a green LED lights up, which indicates that the charger is ready for use.

When the “Start” button is pressed, the electromagnetic relay closes its contacts, and the battery is connected to the output of the mains rectifier, and the battery charging process begins. The red LED lights up and the green one goes out. After 50-60 minutes, the relay opens the battery charging circuit. The green LED lights up and the red one goes out. Charging complete.

After charging, the voltage at the battery terminals can reach 16.8 volts.

This operation algorithm is primitive and eventually leads to the so-called “memory effect” of the battery. That is, the capacity of the battery decreases.

If you follow the correct algorithm for charging the battery, first, each of its elements must be discharged to 1 volt. Those. a block of 12 batteries must be discharged to 12 volts. In the charger for the screwdriver, this mode not implemented.

Here is the charging characteristic of one 1.2V Ni-Cd battery cell.

The graph shows how the temperature of the element (temperature), the voltage at its terminals (voltage) and the relative pressure (relative pressure) change during charging.

Specialized charge controllers for Ni-Cd and Ni-MH batteries, as a rule, work according to the so-called delta method.. The figure shows that at the end of the cell charging, the voltage decreases by a small amount. about 10mV (for Ni-Cd) and 4mV (for Ni-MH). Based on this voltage change, the controller determines whether the element is charged.

Also, during charging, the temperature of the element is monitored using a temperature sensor. Immediately on the graph you can see that the temperature of the charged cell is about 45 0 С.

Let’s go back to the charger circuit from the screwdriver. Now it is clear that the JDD-45 thermal switch monitors the temperature of the battery pack and breaks the charge circuit when the temperature reaches somewhere around 45 ° C. Sometimes this happens before the timer on the HCF4060BE microcircuit is triggered. This happens when the capacity of the battery has decreased due to the “memory effect”. At the same time, a full charge of such a battery occurs a little faster than in 60 minutes.

As you can see from the circuitry, the charging algorithm is not the most optimal and eventually leads to a loss of the battery’s electrical capacity. Therefore, you can use a universal charger to charge the battery, such as the Turnigy Accucell 6.

Charger for electric screwdriver “Interskol

The power section of the screwdriver charger is a power transformer type GS-1415 designed for a power of 25 watts.

A reduced alternating voltage of 18V is removed from the secondary winding of the transformer, it follows on diode bridge of 4 diodes VD1-VD4 type 1N5408, through a fuse. Diode bridge. Each 1N5408 semiconductor element is rated for forward currents up to three amperes. The electrolytic capacitance C1 smooths out the ripple appearing in the circuit after the diode bridge.

Management is implemented on a microassembly HCF4060BE, which combines a 14-bit counter with oscillator components. It drives a bipolar transistor type S9012. It is loaded on a relay of type S3-12A. Thus, a timer is schematically implemented, which turns on the relay for a time of charging the battery for about an hour. When the charger is turned on and the battery is connected, the relay contacts are in the normally open position. HCF4060BE receives power through a 12 volt zener diode 1N4742A, because about 24 volts goes from the rectifier output.

When the “Start” button is closed, the voltage from the rectifier begins to follow to the zener diode through the resistance R6, then the stabilized voltage goes to the 16th pin of U1. The S9012 transistor, which is controlled by the HCF4060BE, turns on. The voltage across the open junctions of the S9012 transistor follows the relay coil. The contacts of the latter are closed, and the battery begins to charge. The protective diode VD8 (1N4007) bypasses the relay and protects VT from a reverse voltage surge that occurs when the relay winding is de-energized. VD5 prevents the battery from discharging when the mains voltage is disconnected. With the opening of the contacts of the “Start” button, nothing will happen because the power goes through the diode VD7 (1N4007), the Zener diode VD6 and the quenching resistor R6. Therefore, the microcircuit will receive power even after the button is released.

Replaceable typical battery from the power tool is assembled from separate series-connected nickel-cadmium Ni-Cd batteries, each of 1.2 volts, so there are 12 of them. The total voltage of such a battery will be about 14.4 volts. In addition, a temperature sensor has been added to the battery pack. SA1 it is glued to one of the Ni-Cd batteries and fits snugly to it. One of the terminals of the thermostat is connected to the minus of the storage battery. The second pin is connected to a separate, third connector.

When the “Start” button is pressed, the relay closes its contacts, and the battery charging process begins. The red LED lights up. An hour later, the relay with its contacts breaks the battery charge circuit of the screwdriver. The green LED lights up and the red one goes out.

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A thermal contact monitors the temperature of the battery and breaks the charging circuit if the temperature is above 45 °. If this happens before the timer circuit runs out, this indicates the presence of a “memory effect”.

Interskol electric screwdriver charger malfunctions

Replaceable battery.

The GB1 replaceable battery is a block in which 12 nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) cells are connected in series, each with 1.2 volts.

In the schematic diagram, the elements of the replaceable battery are circled with a dotted line.

The total voltage of such a composite battery is 14.4 volts.

A temperature sensor is also built into the battery pack. In the diagram, it is designated as SA1. In principle, it is similar to the thermal switches of the KSD series. Thermal switch marking JJD-45 2A. Structurally, it is fixed on one of the Ni-Cd cells and fits tightly to it.

One of the terminals of the temperature sensor is connected to the negative terminal of the storage battery. The second pin is connected to a separate, third connector.

Scheme, device, repair

Without a doubt, the power tool greatly facilitates our work, and also reduces the time of routine operations. All kinds of self-powered screwdrivers are now in use.

Consider the device, the schematic diagram and the repair of the battery charger from the Interskol screwdriver.

First, let’s take a look at the schematic diagram. It is copied from a real PCB of the charger.

Charger PCB (CDQ-F06K1).

The power section of the charger consists of a GS-1415 power transformer. Its power is about 25-26 watts. I counted according to the simplified formula, which I have already spoken about here.

The reduced alternating voltage 18V from the secondary winding of the transformer is fed to the diode bridge through the fuse FU1. The diode bridge consists of 4 diodes VD1-VD4 type 1N5408. Each of the 1N5408 diodes withstands a forward current of 3 amperes. Electrolytic capacitor C1 smooths the voltage ripple downstream of the diode bridge.

The basis of the control circuit is the HCF4060BE microcircuit, which is a 14-bit counter with elements for the master oscillator. It drives the S9012 pnp bipolar transistor. The transistor is loaded on the S3-12A electromagnetic relay. A kind of timer is implemented on the U1 microcircuit, which turns on the relay for a given charge time. about 60 minutes.

When the charger is connected to the network and the battery is connected, the contacts of the JDQK1 relay are open.

The HCF4060BE microcircuit is powered by a VD6 Zener diode. 1N4742A (12V). The zener diode limits the voltage from the mains rectifier to 12 volts, since its output is about 24 volts.

If you look at the diagram, it is not difficult to notice that before pressing the “Start” button, the U1 HCF4060BE microcircuit is de-energized. disconnected from the power source. When the “Start” button is pressed, the supply voltage from the rectifier goes to the 1N4742A zener diode through the resistor R6.

Further, the reduced and stabilized voltage is supplied to the 16th pin of the U1 microcircuit. The microcircuit starts to work, and also the S9012 transistor, which it controls, opens.

The supply voltage through the open transistor S9012 is supplied to the winding of the JDQK1 electromagnetic relay. The relay contacts close and supply voltage to the battery. The battery starts charging. The VD8 diode (1N4007) shunts the relay and protects the S9012 transistor from a reverse voltage surge that occurs when the relay winding is de-energized.

Diode VD5 (1N5408) protects the battery from discharge if the mains supply is suddenly cut off.

What will happen after the contacts of the “Start” button open? The diagram shows that when the contacts of the electromagnetic relay are closed, the positive voltage through the diode VD7 (1N4007) goes to the Zener diode VD6 through the quenching resistor R6. As a result, the U1 microcircuit remains connected to the power source even after the button contacts are open.

Charging circuit

The standard wiring diagram of the electric screwdriver charger includes a three-channel type microcircuit. In this case, four transistors for the 12 V model are required. In terms of capacity, they can be quite different. In order for the device to cope with the high clock frequency, capacitors are attached to the microcircuit. They are used for charging both impulse and transient types. In this case, it is important to take into account the characteristics of specific batteries.

Directly thyristors are used in devices for current stabilization. In some models, open-type tetrodes are installed. They differ in current conductivity. If we consider modifications for 18 V, then there are often dipole filters. These elements allow you to easily cope with network congestion.

2V modifications

A 12 V charger for electric screwdriver batteries (the diagram is shown below) is a set of transistors with a capacity of up to 4.4 pF. In this case, the conductivity in the circuit is provided at a level of 9 microns. To prevent the clock frequency from increasing sharply, capacitors are used. Resistors in models are used mainly field.

If we talk about charging on tetrodes, then there is additionally a phase resistor. It copes well with electromagnetic vibrations. Negative resistance with 12 V charges is maintained at 30 ohms. They are most often used for 10 mAh rechargeable batteries. Today they are actively used in models of the “Makita” trademark.

charger, device, interskol, electric, screwdriver

4 volt chargers

The charger circuit for a 14 V electric screwdriver transistors includes five pieces. Directly, the microcircuit for converting current is only suitable for a four-channel type. Capacitors for 14 V models are pulsed. If we talk about batteries with a capacity of 12 mAh, then tetrodes are additionally installed there. In this case, there are two diodes on the microcircuit. If we talk about the charging parameters, then the current conductivity in the circuit, as a rule, fluctuates around 5 microns. On average, the capacitance of the resistor in the circuit does not exceed 6.3 pF.

Directly loads of charging current at 14 V are able to withstand 3.3 A. Triggers in such models are installed quite rarely. However, if we consider the Bosch brand screwdrivers, they are often used there. In turn, in the “Makita” models, they are replaced by wave resistors. In order to stabilize the voltage, they fit well. However, the charging frequency can vary greatly.

Use of BC847 transistors

The charger circuit for the BC847 electric screwdriver is quite simple. The specified elements are used most often by the “Makita” company. They are suitable for 12 mAh batteries. In this case, the microcircuits are of a three-channel type. Capacitors are used with double diodes.

Directly triggers are used of an open type, and their current conductivity is at the level of 5.5 microns. In total, three transistors are required to charge 12 V. One of them is installed at the capacitors. The rest in this case are located behind the reference diodes. If we talk about voltage, then 12 V overload charges with these transistors are capable of carrying 5 A.

Scheme for the model “Makita

The charger circuit of the Makita electric screwdriver has a three-channel type microcircuit. There are three transistors in total in the circuit. If we talk about 18 V screwdrivers, then in this case the capacitors are installed with a capacity of 4.5 pF. Conductivity is provided in the region of 6 microns.

All this allows you to remove the load from the transistors. Directly, tetrodes are used of an open type. If we talk about modifications for 14 V, then the chargers are available with special triggers. These elements allow you to perfectly cope with the increased frequency of the device. At the same time, they are not afraid of online jumps.

8V model circuits

At 18 V, the charger circuit for an electric screwdriver assumes the use of transistors only of the transition type. There are three capacitors on the microcircuit. Directly the tetrode is installed with a diode bridge. To stabilize the limiting frequency, the device uses a grid trigger. If we talk about charging parameters for 18 V, then it should be mentioned that the current conductivity fluctuates around 5.4 microns.

If we consider chargers for Bosch screwdrivers, then this figure may be higher. In some cases, chromatic resistors are used to improve signal conductivity. In this case, the capacitance of the capacitors should not exceed 15 pF. If we consider the chargers of the “Interskol” trademark, then they use transceivers with increased conductivity. In this case, the maximum current load parameter can reach 6 A. At the end, mention should be made of the Makita devices. Many of the battery models are equipped with high quality dipole transistors. They cope well with increased negative resistance. However, problems in some cases arise with magnetic vibrations.

Charger circuit for an electric screwdriver. Electric screwdriver charger wiring diagram

Many modern screwdrivers operate on a rechargeable battery. Their capacity is on average 12 mAh. In order for the device to always remain in working order, a charger is needed. However, they are quite different in voltage.

Nowadays, models are produced for 12, 14 and 18 V. It is also important to note that manufacturers use various components for chargers. In order to understand this issue, you should take a look at the standard charger circuit.